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Positional Release Techniques

Happy Valentine's Day! Use Code LOVECE through February 14th for 20% CE Savings

24 CE Hours - E1090
4.25 out of 5 stars
  • 5 star 61%
  • 4 star 26%
  • 3 star 8%
  • 2 star 4%
  • 1 star 1%
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285 customer reviews
Positional Release Techniques

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Materials

  • Text - 251 pages
  • Multiple-choice test
  • Certificate upon completion

Description

Positional release techniques are gentle manual treatments to relieve pain and discomfort, improving the overall health and functioning of the body by correcting imbalances of the musculoskeletal system. The advanced course covers all methods of spontaneous release by positioning. Theories and history of many different approaches are discussed and techniques are described in detail through illustrations and photographs. The associated online videos provide demonstrations of the techniques as well.

Also included in this continuing education course:

  • comparisons of all major positional release methods, from strain/counterstrain to functional osteopathy and step-by-step use of these methods
  • use with other manual approaches, such as Muscle Energy Techniques
  • treatment of both muscle and joint problems
  • various approaches: osteopathic palpation according to Gibbons and Tehan; positional release palpation according to McPartland and Goodridge; the tight-loose concept; Zink's concept of tissue preference and assessment, and Travell and Simon's model of trigger point facilitation
  • characteristics of trigger points; the causes for trigger points and types of trigger points
  • uses of positional release methods for post-operative conditions

Course Objectives

  1. List, describe and compare the movement patterns of at least four of the positional release variations.
  2. Compare and contrast the following approaches: osteopathic palpation according to Gibbons and Tehan; positional release palpation according to McPartland and Goodridge; the tight-loose concept; Zink’s concept of tissue preference and assessment, and Travell and Simon’s model of trigger point facilitation.
  3. Compare the Proprioceptive Hypothesis with the Nociceptive Hypothesis and recognize the five major fascial chains described in Myer’s Anatomy Trains.
  4. Describe the following in accordance with Jones’ SCS practice: positioning; prioritizing points for treatment; feedback, and fine-tuning the ease position.
  5. Recognize the contraindications and cautions of SCS in at least three of the following areas: cervical flexion, suboccipital, lower cervical spine, upper thoracic spine and lumbar spine.
  6. List the SCS guidelines and describe the key elements of assessment in the Spencer shoulder sequence.
  7. Compare the key elements of Goodheart’s Coccygeal Lift Technique with Morrison’s Inguinal Lift Technique.
  8. List and describe the characteristics of trigger points; the causes for trigger points, and at least three types of trigger points.
  9. Explain the INIT hypothesis and describe the two INIT methods of treatment.
  10. Recognize the possible uses of positional release methods for each of the following post-operative conditions: traumatized fascial structures, rib restrictions, lymphatic stasis and the side-effects and the advantages of using SCS in a hospital setting.
  11. List the five major elements of Sutherland’s cranial hypothesis.
  12. Describe Jone’s methodology of locating tender points on the cranium.
  13. Compare the positional release methods for TMJ as proposed by: DiGiovanna, Upledger and Goodheart.
  14. Compare Mulligan’s concepts and methods to Positional Release Techniques.
  15. Describe the components of Mulligan’s Concept.
  16. Compare and contrast the techniques, rules, protocols and common errors for each of the following methods: NAGs, SNAGs and MWMs.
  17. Compare direct methods of taping to indirect methods of taping.
  18. Describe the purpose and/or function of proprioceptive taping.

Course Reviews

Meredith Alcorn

12/4/2022

I expected videos that guided me through the process and showed examples of the tissue work being executed while talking you through the process and maybe you have courses like that, but this is not that course. Strictly reading the text and then answering the test questions are not a really effective way for me to learn. There was a lot of medical jargon that while I understand it, it was tedious and slowed me down in the process and I had to spend extra time re-reading and searching through the text. The material is very interesting to me. I wish the course was layed out better.

John Bryson

11/30/2022

The material is top-notch, coming from Leon Chaitow. However, the text was quite long, so I had to skim portions and limit my understanding to complete the reading and locate the quiz answers. There were a few quiz questions that I felt missed the mark at capturing the important information in the section from which they derived.

Kristine Maravelas

11/9/2022

This course was great; however, I am such a kinesthetic learner that I look forward to taking an in class course. It was difficult for me to stay engaged because of the length of this course. I look forward to expanding my knowledge in positional release with some hands on practice and other future courses.

Anna Wodzislawski

8/4/2022

All courses I have taken with Institute for Integrative Healthcare Studies contributed greatly to my knowledge and skills. PRT has been challenging and powerful, expanding my sensitivity and awareness. Presented techniques are excellent, they will enhance development of my proprioceptive senses for tissue evaluation + treatment. I am interested in courses presenting gentle application approaches.

Lisa Kay, LMT

3/31/2022

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Instructors

Sharon Burch, MSN, RN, NCTMB

Sharon Burch, MSN, RN, NCTMB

Sharon Burch holds a Masters Degree in Nursing and has been practicing as a nurse since 1974. She is currently a Registered Nurse in the state of Arkansas. Additionally, Ms. Burch studied under many of today's leaders in massage therapy and bodywork during the 1980s, became Nationally Certified through the NCBTMB in 1993 and holds a professional membership with the AMTA.

As founder of Health Positive!, Ms. Burch has created over 60 home study nursing and massage continuing education programs, performed over 65 public, live educational presentations, has written two published books, served as a member on the NCBTMB Continuing Education committee and was a founding member of the National Association of Nurse Massage Therapists.

Sharon is an instructor on many of the Institute's programs and has authored and co-authored various ethics courses and additional titles such as Touch for the Seriously Ill, Stress Reduction Through Bodywork, Staying Well – Naturally, Cardiopulmonary Health and Illness, Chronic Pain Management, Marketing Massage in Four Easy Steps, Preventing Medical Errors, HIV Update for Massage Therapists and Bodyworkers, Understanding HIV, Massage for Edema and more.

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